How To Prepare Your Home for Every Season

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Once you become a homeowner, you will become responsible for your home’s upkeep and maintenance. This is quite a relevant issue that requires both effort and knowledge on your own part. While maintenance is often seen as something handled through a list of day-to-day tasks, the truth is that there are some seasonal tasks that are just as relevant. Preparing your home for every season and committing to these seasonal repairs is incredibly important. Here are some examples.

Winter

As the year starts with winter, so does our list. What you need to do is oil all your doors, seeing as how viscosity may help keep them defrosted. You also need to winterize all your outdoor pipes (in early winter) by draining them and shutting them off. If there are any outdoor faucets, you could even dismantle them and bring them inside. Those who have outdoor seating areas may want to consider moving furniture to a shed/basement/garage. They could at least move the cushions.

The key thing is that your insulation is sealed. If there are any holes or gaps, you will notice this soon enough. This is also a great time for you to seal them, thus raising the energy-efficiency of your home. Most importantly, this is the time of the year when you’re expected to clean the snow on a regular basis. Make sure you have all you need for this task.

Spring

During the spring, you need to check your roof for any winter damage. Any shift in temperature is dangerous for your home’s exterior, not to mention the fact that snow may put some extra weight on your roof. This means that the same goes for those with aluminium louvres above their patio. From here, proceed to inspect the rest of your property. Chances are that your garden may have suffered a bit due to winter and this is something that you should address rather quickly.

Now, the thing that the majority of people were expecting here is the spring cleaning. You should separate this into tasks, as well. Start with windows washing, since warmer temperatures are quite friendly towards letting the place breathe. Wash your carpets and declutter the interior and there you have it.

Summer

During summer, you might want to focus on outdoor work and the work that requires warm temperatures. First, you want to clear rain gutters, seeing as how the likelihood of rain is the lowest during this season. Second, you want to check your sprinkler system, since the irrigation of your outdoors might be even more important than before. Also, spend some time to check all your cooling devices. This is the ideal time to check your refrigerator.

Needless to say, summer is also the best time of the year for all sorts of plumbing work. You can have your drain cleaned, check your faucets and showerheads, and more. Why is that? Well, because if there’s a leak somewhere, you can wipe it, wash it and it will be dry in a matter of minutes. This is a huge boon, to begin with.

Autumn

In autumn, you need to clean up leaves and branches on a regular basis, however, you also need to prepare your home for the winter. Chances are that the heating season will start well before the winter. This is why you should use the start of autumn to make sure that the heating system is winter-ready. For instance, if your heating system is using solid fuel, you want to clean the chimney and adjust flues. You also want to do basic furnace maintenance.

Other than this, you need to clean your humidifier. Most importantly, you need to do a thorough inspection of your home’s interior. Look for infestations of wasps, termites, and similar pests. As the weather goes colder, they will slowly start migrating inside.

The fact that these tasks aren’t performed as often as some other tasks (like vacuuming and dusting) makes people downplay their significance or even completely forget about them. This is, however, quite far from the truth. In order not to forget them, you need to fully read into their significance and schedule these tasks properly.

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